Alex Carruthers comments in The Telegraph on how confinement can increase pressure on a couple’s relationship

Alex Carruthers HFC

Alex Carruthers comments in The Telegraph on how confinement can increase pressure on a couple’s relationship

This week the World Health Organization has urged people to reduce their alcohol consumption and increase activity in order to be fighting fit against Covid-19. Drink Aware advises that the last thing we should be doing to protect ourselves is upping our alcohol intake. It suppresses our immune system, meaning we’ll be less able to fight off the virus should we catch it, affects our sleep patterns and can negatively impact on mental health.

A week ago, the Government designated ‘off-licences and licensed shops selling alcohol’ as part of the essential services that could remain open. While grocery sales increased 20.6 per cent in March, sales of alcohol jumped by 22 per cent or a staggering £199 million.

Although alcohol is a factor in much of the domestic abuse that is feared to rise, for others it can help oil the wheels of romance. If sharing a bottle of wine helps couples iron out the tensions of working alongside each other, this can only be a good thing. However, in cities like Wuhan, divorce petitions have risen.

Alex Carruthers commented:  “confinement is likely to place increased pressure on a couple’s relationship. I’ve already seen examples of this extra tension breaking the camel’s back and being enough to end the relationship.”

Read Alex’s comments in The Telegraph.